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2016.012: Voir Dire Seminar in Dallas

Blog - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 18:50

Along with Heather Barbieri of Plano and Kerri Anderson Donica of Corsicana, I’m course-directing the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Associations’ voir dire seminar in Dallas September 8–9, 2016. Here’s a draft description of the seminar for TCDLA’s marketing:

This two-day intensive seminar — a combination of lectures, discussions, and demonstrations of voir dire strategies and tools — is a must for the criminal-defense lawyer who tries cases.

Jury trials are won and lost in voir dire. Voir dire is not just your only chance to eliminate unfavorable jurors legally, but also your best chance to persuade the jury that your story of the case is the truth.

In Voir Dire Outside the (Jury) Box you will learn theories of voir dire. You will learn inventive and useful techniques for connecting with jurors. You will learn to apply those theories and techniques in specific types of cases. You will be entertained. Your mind will be blown, and you will leave on Friday with something new that will help you win a jury trial on Monday.

Voir Dire Outside the (Jury) Box is a unique opportunity to learn jury selection from the leaders of the Texas criminal-defense bar; it will benefit the newcomer and the veteran alike. The seminar includes a discount on tickets to the Dallas Comedy House’s Thursday evening improv show. And, as always, scholarships are available.

As well as the usual popular topics — error preservation, defenses, jury suppression voir dire, DWI voir dire, child sex assault voir dire, and so forth — we plan to introduce some new ways of looking at the whole voir dire process. The promise of blown minds is mine, and I am not one to overpromise.

Join us in Dallas. Calendar it now.

2016.012: Voir Dire Seminar in Dallas

Mark's Blog: Defending People - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 18:50

Along with Heather Barbieri of Plano and Kerri Anderson Donica of Corsicana, I’m course-directing the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Associations’ voir dire seminar in Dallas September 8–9, 2016. Here’s a draft description of the seminar for TCDLA’s marketing:

This two-day intensive seminar — a combination of lectures, discussions, and demonstrations of voir dire strategies and tools — is a must for the criminal-defense lawyer who tries cases.

Jury trials are won and lost in voir dire. Voir dire is not just your only chance to eliminate unfavorable jurors legally, but also your best chance to persuade the jury that your story of the case is the truth.

In Voir Dire Outside the (Jury) Box you will learn theories of voir dire. You will learn inventive and useful techniques for connecting with jurors. You will learn to apply those theories and techniques in specific types of cases. You will be entertained. Your mind will be blown, and you will leave on Friday with something new that will help you win a jury trial on Monday.

Voir Dire Outside the (Jury) Box is a unique opportunity to learn jury selection from the leaders of the Texas criminal-defense bar; it will benefit the newcomer and the veteran alike. The seminar includes a discount on tickets to the Dallas Comedy House’s Thursday evening improv show. And, as always, scholarships are available.

As well as the usual popular topics — error preservation, defenses, jury suppression voir dire, DWI voir dire, child sex assault voir dire, and so forth — we plan to introduce some new ways of looking at the whole voir dire process. The promise of blown minds is mine, and I am not one to overpromise.

Join us in Dallas. Calendar it now.

2016.011: Followup on Three Good Deeds

Blog - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 18:35

Apropos of this post, I learned some interesting things at the courthouse.

Rumor is that the judge put Sam up to commenting on my blog — believable, since Sam isn’t the type to comment on blogs. Unfortunately the judge doesn’t seem to have told Sam the truth about her private sanction so he’s left denying something that I can prove to be true.

I also learned that the judge retaliated against one of her court staff for telling the truth to the Commission for Judicial Conduct about the incident for which she was sanctioned — which incident, I was reminded, was the judge’s retaliation for my client not kowtowing to her rudeness in the first place.

So: Judge is rude to lawyer. Lawyer stands up for herself. Judge retaliates against lawyer. Mark stands up for lawyer. Judge retaliates against Mark. Court staff stands up for truth. Judge retaliates against court staff. Classy!

Maybe the judge has a friend who can talk to her about the First Rule of Holes.

Sam?

2016.011: Followup on Three Good Deeds

Mark's Blog: Defending People - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 18:35

Apropos of this post, I learned some interesting things at the courthouse.

Rumor is that the judge put Sam up to commenting on my blog — believable, since Sam isn’t the type to comment on blogs. Unfortunately the judge doesn’t seem to have told Sam the truth about her private sanction so he’s left denying something that I can prove to be true.

I also learned that the judge retaliated against one of her court staff for telling the truth to the Commission for Judicial Conduct about the incident for which she was sanctioned — which incident, I was reminded, was the judge’s retaliation for my client not kowtowing to her rudeness in the first place.

So: Judge is rude to lawyer. Lawyer stands up for herself. Judge retaliates against lawyer. Mark stands up for lawyer. Judge retaliates against Mark. Court staff stands up for truth. Judge retaliates against court staff. Classy!

Maybe the judge has a friend who can talk to her about the First Rule of Holes.

Sam?

2016.010: Brown & Musslewhite

Blog - Wed, 05/18/2016 - 10:38

The Houston personal-injury firm of Brown and Musslewhite was ripping off Houston criminal-defense badass JoAnne Musick’s blog posts. So she did what any self-respecting lawyer/writer would do in that situation: she gave the firm a polite telephone call to ask confidentially that they remove the offending comment—

Just kidding. JoAnne did what any self-respecting lawyer/writer would do in that situation: she called Brown & Musslewhite out publicly so that from now until the crack of internet doom there will be a record of their dishonest unethical ways:

I would never hire a lawyer engaging in such practice. It’s unethical and just plain wrong. Color me offended and sad that they have chosen to use my name and my words to try and make themselves look better. Don’t try to make yourself look better; be better!

Amen, sister.

Why is writing the post better than making the call? Because — and I’m speaking from extensive experience here, having made the call time after time only to be left flat on my back like Charlie Brown — when you make that call you don’t get taken seriously. Instead you waste your time listening to excuses — “my marketer did it” — and rationalizations — “well, we gave you credit.” The extreme, by contrast, always seems to make an impression.

It makes an impression on its subject, and it makes an impression on others. If JoAnne had made the call, maybe Brown & Musslewhite would have stopped stealing content, but nobody else would have learned anything from the exercise. By posting about Brown & Musslewhite’s theft, JoAnne both discouraged others from stealing content and stopped Brown & Musslewhite from doing so—

Just kidding. Brown & Musslewhite took down JoAnne‘s content, but they still are republishing as though it is their own writing by people outside their firm: William K. Berenson, Randy Sorrels, Sam Adamo, Jr. (on HCCLAtv.com), and others.

HCCLA cares about people stealing its content, but what if none of the others care about Brown & Musslewhite stealing their content? We are not even personal-injury lawyers, for crying out loud. Shouldn’t JoAnne just mind her own business? Shouldn’t I?
Yes, absolutely, because this is profession for ladies and gentlemen, and ladies and gentlemen mind their own business—Just kidding.Lawyers minding their own business allow unethical lawyers to thrive, giving the bar a bad name. And while I joke that it’s a small fraction of the bar that gives the other 1% a bad reputation, the truth is that most lawyers are concerned with practicing ethically themselves. They would not deserve the bad name that the minority give them, except for one thing: They mind their own business. Like the majority of bad cops whose only offense is following the blue code, lawyers who don’t speak out against unethical lawyers are also unethical lawyers.
Writing is thinking. Publishing someone else’s work as though it is your own is a lie. Publishing the work of a lawyer outside your firm as though it is your firm’s is fraud: Potential clients will see it, will naturally believe it is characteristic of the firm’s thinking, and will make their decision based on what they believe is a sample of the firm’s thinking. If you think lawyers should mind their own business when they see lawyers defrauding potential clients, you are part of the problem.

2016.010: Brown & Musslewhite

Mark's Blog: Defending People - Wed, 05/18/2016 - 10:38

The Houston personal-injury firm of Brown and Musslewhite was ripping off Houston criminal-defense badass JoAnne Musick’s blog posts. So she did what any self-respecting lawyer/writer would do in that situation: she gave the firm a polite telephone call to ask confidentially that they remove the offending comment—

Just kidding. JoAnne did what any self-respecting lawyer/writer would do in that situation: she called Brown & Musslewhite out publicly so that from now until the crack of internet doom there will be a record of their dishonest unethical ways:

I would never hire a lawyer engaging in such practice. It’s unethical and just plain wrong. Color me offended and sad that they have chosen to use my name and my words to try and make themselves look better. Don’t try to make yourself look better; be better!

Amen, sister.

Why is writing the post better than making the call? Because — and I’m speaking from extensive experience here, having made the call time after time only to be left flat on my back like Charlie Brown — when you make that call you don’t get taken seriously. Instead you waste your time listening to excuses — “my marketer did it” — and rationalizations — “well, we gave you credit.” The extreme, by contrast, always seems to make an impression.

It makes an impression on its subject, and it makes an impression on others. If JoAnne had made the call, maybe Brown & Musslewhite would have stopped stealing content, but nobody else would have learned anything from the exercise. By posting about Brown & Musslewhite’s theft, JoAnne both discouraged others from stealing content and stopped Brown & Musslewhite from doing so—

Just kidding. Brown & Musslewhite took down JoAnne‘s content, but they still are republishing as though it is their own writing by people outside their firm: William K. Berenson, Randy Sorrels, Sam Adamo, Jr. (on HCCLAtv.com), and others.

HCCLA cares about people stealing its content, but what if none of the others care about Brown & Musslewhite stealing their content? We are not even personal-injury lawyers, for crying out loud. Shouldn’t JoAnne just mind her own business? Shouldn’t I?
Yes, absolutely, because this is profession for ladies and gentlemen, and ladies and gentlemen mind their own business—Just kidding.Lawyers minding their own business allow unethical lawyers to thrive, giving the bar a bad name. And while I joke that it’s a small fraction of the bar that gives the other 1% a bad reputation, the truth is that most lawyers are concerned with practicing ethically themselves. They would not deserve the bad name that the minority give them, except for one thing: They mind their own business. Like the majority of bad cops whose only offense is following the blue code, lawyers who don’t speak out against unethical lawyers are also unethical lawyers.
Writing is thinking. Publishing someone else’s work as though it is your own is a lie. Publishing the work of a lawyer outside your firm as though it is your firm’s is fraud: Potential clients will see it, will naturally believe it is characteristic of the firm’s thinking, and will make their decision based on what they believe is a sample of the firm’s thinking. If you think lawyers should mind their own business when they see lawyers defrauding potential clients, you are part of the problem.

2016.009 Three Good Deeds

Blog - Wed, 05/11/2016 - 11:19

Speaking of kindnesses…

She was never my favorite judge. She was fair in trial, which is more than I can say for most of our local bench, but she was irascible in the runup to trial; it didn’t seem personal, but she was not “patient, dignified and courteous,” as required by the Texas Canons of Judicial Conduct. Still, when the Harris County district court judge tragically lost her grown son, I sent her my condolences because it was the right thing to do. She hugged me in the hallway and thanked me the next time she saw me. We were cool for a while. She treated me professionally, and not with the usual rudeness.

When the judge ordered one of my colleagues into custody for doing her job I stood up for my colleague. When she filed a grievance against the judge, I wrote an affidavit describing what I had observed. Because it was the right thing to do. The judge received a private reprimand, (a big deal coming from the usually toothless Commission for Judicial Conduct, which usually disciplines judges by requiring them to buy the next round): A judge who has once been privately reprimanded doesn’t want to be grieved again.

When another colleague died, I took over one of his cases in the judge’s court. It was, again, the right thing to do. Last week I had a sweet deal worked out for that client. I realized as I was going over the plea papers with him that we hadn’t checked with an immigration lawyer to make sure that the sweet deal was really sweet. I asked the judge for two more days before doing the plea. Giving me two days would have cost her nothing and benefited me no farther than keeping me from committing malpractice. Everybody knew I was going to get my two days, but the judge was rude to me. I had “just asked her for another day yesterday” (not true) and “was losing credibility.” That a new personal edge to the old failure to be patient, dignified, and courteous.

I explained that I hadn’t crossed this particular T because of the irregular way the case had come to me — as a mitzvah to a fallen comrade. I hadn’t done my usual intake.

The judge said, “well, no good deed goes unpunished.”

Okay, judge. Okay.

On reflection, I wonder which of these three good deeds the judge was talking about. I doubt that it was the first, and maybe it was the third, but I have a sneaking suspicion it was the second — my representation of the lawyer she had unlawfully jailed.

Was the judge butthurt by my providing a factual account of that incident to the Commission on Judicial Conduct? Is she bent on punishing me? I would like to know. Not so that I can avoid the same sort of good deed in the future but so that I can it more. I’ve got a defiant streak, and if you try to punish me for doing the right thing, I’ll look for more opportunities to do the right thing the same way.

And opportunities abound. Remember: Patient, dignified and courteous.

2016.009 Three Good Deeds

Mark's Blog: Defending People - Wed, 05/11/2016 - 11:19

Speaking of kindnesses…

She was never my favorite judge. She was fair in trial, which is more than I can say for most of our local bench, but she was irascible in the runup to trial; it didn’t seem personal, but she was not “patient, dignified and courteous,” as required by the Texas Canons of Judicial Conduct. Still, when the Harris County district court judge tragically lost her grown son, I sent her my condolences because it was the right thing to do. She hugged me in the hallway and thanked me the next time she saw me. We were cool for a while. She treated me professionally, and not with the usual rudeness.

When the judge ordered one of my colleagues into custody for doing her job I stood up for my colleague. When she filed a grievance against the judge, I wrote an affidavit describing what I had observed. Because it was the right thing to do. The judge received a private reprimand, (a big deal coming from the usually toothless Commission for Judicial Conduct, which usually disciplines judges by requiring them to buy the next round): A judge who has once been privately reprimanded doesn’t want to be grieved again.

When another colleague died, I took over one of his cases in the judge’s court. It was, again, the right thing to do. Last week I had a sweet deal worked out for that client. I realized as I was going over the plea papers with him that we hadn’t checked with an immigration lawyer to make sure that the sweet deal was really sweet. I asked the judge for two more days before doing the plea. Giving me two days would have cost her nothing and benefited me no farther than keeping me from committing malpractice. Everybody knew I was going to get my two days, but the judge was rude to me. I had “just asked her for another day yesterday” (not true) and “was losing credibility.” That a new personal edge to the old failure to be patient, dignified, and courteous.

I explained that I hadn’t crossed this particular T because of the irregular way the case had come to me — as a mitzvah to a fallen comrade. I hadn’t done my usual intake.

The judge said, “well, no good deed goes unpunished.”

Okay, judge. Okay.

On reflection, I wonder which of these three good deeds the judge was talking about. I doubt that it was the first, and maybe it was the third, but I have a sneaking suspicion it was the second — my representation of the lawyer she had unlawfully jailed.

Was the judge butthurt by my providing a factual account of that incident to the Commission on Judicial Conduct? Is she bent on punishing me? I would like to know. Not so that I can avoid the same sort of good deed in the future but so that I can it more. I’ve got a defiant streak, and if you try to punish me for doing the right thing, I’ll look for more opportunities to do the right thing the same way.

And opportunities abound. Remember: Patient, dignified and courteous.

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